You are not logged in.

Gougai! Gougai!

GUYS GUYS I JUST UPLOADED THE 1997 UTENA MUSICAL IN HIGH DEFINITION straight from the Japanese Blu-rays! i am now very tired goodnight

Also, our Secret Santa is going on! Come join in the fun!

#1526 | Back to Top05-24-2015 11:52:01 AM

Nocturnalux
Qualified Duellist
From: Portugal
Registered: 09-10-2007
Posts: 741

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

YamPuff wrote:

Nocturnalux wrote:

The Dark Tower was one of my favorite series...until the last volume. I finished it and nearly threw it against a wall.

I just loved that it [ended where it began, it's the only book I've ever read that did that trope perfectly IMO.] The ending was quite flawed but I still enjoyed the whole thing thoroughly.

I also watched The Good, The Bsd and The Ugly for the first time after reading the Dark Tower series, made for an entertaining watch!! Roland really is Clint Eastwood! XD

[I did not like the circular ending at all. But what really annoyed me what came right before that when King interrupts the narrative, breaks the 4th wall and addresses the reader by telling them that if they do not want to be upset by the ending then they might as well stop reading right there. I could deal with the arrogance but worse of all it entirely spoiled the mood by reminding me I was reading a book. Then again King had already self-inserted himself as some messiah figure a few chapters back so I guess it was to be expected.

At that point King was fed up with the Dark Tower and was very tired of eager fans always pestering him to finish it which may explain why he kills off two of the most popular characters in a single paragraph, this in a writer known to drag things for seas of ink on end, and keep Odetta who was more or less universally hated. It is as if King was giving the fans the middle finger for having been on this case for years.
]

Offline

 

#1527 | Back to Top05-26-2015 12:15:10 PM

Sweetgm2
Juri Jeerer
Registered: 02-16-2015
Posts: 40

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

I find the Anne of Green Gables, Jane Eyre, A Little Princess, and A Secret Garden books charming.  Any others I might like based on those?

Offline

 

#1528 | Back to Top05-26-2015 03:59:31 PM

Yams
Nest Boxer
From: Crystal Millenium
Registered: 02-13-2007
Posts: 969

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

I plan to read some Lovecraft novels after a recommendation from a friend on which ones to start with, as well as Tolkein's Silmarillion.

Nocturnalux wrote:

[I did not like the circular ending at all. But what really annoyed me what came right before that when King interrupts the narrative, breaks the 4th wall and addresses the reader by telling them that if they do not want to be upset by the ending then they might as well stop reading right there. I could deal with the arrogance but worse of all it entirely spoiled the mood by reminding me I was reading a book. Then again King had already self-inserted himself as some messiah figure a few chapters back so I guess it was to be expected.

At that point King was fed up with the Dark Tower and was very tired of eager fans always pestering him to finish it which may explain why he kills off two of the most popular characters in a single paragraph, this in a writer known to drag things for seas of ink on end, and keep Odetta who was more or less universally hated. It is as if King was giving the fans the middle finger for having been on this case for years.
]

It's definitely one of those love or hate things. My brother and I both loved it - it's kind of like, go big or go home and he just went 'fuck it, I'm going big'. XD
But I do agree the last book was rushed and overall he made some questionable decisions.

Sweetgm2 wrote:

I find the Anne of Green Gables, Jane Eyre, A Little Princess, and A Secret Garden books charming.  Any others I might like based on those?

Betsy, Tacy and Little Women spring to mind, as well as The Chronicles of Narnia

L M Montgomery also wrote a charming little novel called The Blue Castle which I like a lot.


http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i232/YamPuff/im%20holllowz_zpsx9ddh2gp.png~original

Offline

 

#1529 | Back to Top05-26-2015 04:19:26 PM

Decrescent Daytripper
Best Disney Princess
Registered: 04-09-2007
Posts: 2790

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Sweetgm2 wrote:

I find the Anne of Green Gables, Jane Eyre, A Little Princess, and A Secret Garden books charming.  Any others I might like based on those?

Try the LM Montgomery Emily books. They're really beautiful.


My Brain is the Wakaba and Shiori Funtime Hour. With limited commercial interruption.

Offline

 

#1530 | Back to Top06-02-2015 02:28:25 AM

Snow
Troublesome Insect
From: in the wolf
Registered: 09-30-2013
Posts: 642

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Reading Out by Natsuo Kirino. One of those crime novels where you witness the crime in the beginning. It started a bit slow but the current pace is very exciting. I especially like the way it switches viewpoints, giving us a constantly changing preview into the character's mental state. Some characters still feel like caricatures though([looking at you, Kuniko]).

Read it. [That ending...no. Just no. I can't say if it was bad but it definitely put me off. Was pretty spectacular up to the last dozen pages, even if I kinda could see a bunch of the events coming from a mile away.]

Last edited by Snow (06-03-2015 03:37:06 PM)

Offline

 

#1531 | Back to Top06-04-2015 12:39:31 PM

Enea
Juri Jeerer
From: Poland
Registered: 04-25-2015
Posts: 45

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

So I'm in a half of "The Universe in a Nutshell" by Stephen Hawking and I think that this book is a real miracle. I mean, it's about complicated physical issues and sometimes I feel that I understand some parts of it, which is weird because I have always been a physical dummy (mostly due to my teachers, one of them was teaching us how to open a window properly for, like, two hours...). So, after I will read this... "A Brief History of Time", here I come! :3

Offline

 

#1532 | Back to Top06-05-2015 12:35:42 AM

rhyaniwyn
Myth is my Bitch
From: Tallahassee, FL
Registered: 11-09-2006
Posts: 684
Website

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

So, I read kind of a lot. But I never participate in this thread. I can't remember if we've done this already. Anyone else on Goodreads? I'm here on Goodreads.


http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o165/absolethe/itrg_signature.jpg

Offline

 

#1533 | Back to Top06-05-2015 03:10:39 AM

Giovanna
Ends of the Forum
From: Edmonton, AB
Registered: 10-12-2006
Posts: 8754
Website

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Snow wrote:

Reading Out by Natsuo Kirino.

This was a fantastic book, and if you enjoyed it I strongly recommend trying her other novels as well. Grotesque was fantastic, though I really resent the editing the translation did to remove something that was probably a very effective thing in the novel. It staggers me that now, in 2015, people are able to remove sections of a work of literature because they don't like them, but still have the balls to release a version to get money. Fuck you people. But Kirino is great. emot-smile

Enea wrote:

Stephen Hawking

YAYAY. I'm always glad to see someone reading his books, they're classics for a reason, though I think it was quipped that Brief History of Time was the most popular selling book that no one ever read. I actually found it more accessible than Universe in a Nutshell, though, so if you plodded through that you'll do fine. emot-smile If you feel the need to explore past that, Brian Greene is another really excellent, accessible physicist writing popular science.

Goodreads sounds like something I should do in principle...should I make an independent account or is there some good reason to link it to the unholy Bookface?


Akio, you have nice turns of phrase, but your points aren't clear and you have no textual support. I can't give this a passing grade.
~ Professor Arisa Konno, Eng 1001 (Freshman Literature and Composition)

Online

 

#1534 | Back to Top06-05-2015 04:30:18 PM

Nocturnalux
Qualified Duellist
From: Portugal
Registered: 09-10-2007
Posts: 741

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Giovanna wrote:

Snow wrote:

Reading Out by Natsuo Kirino.

This was a fantastic book, and if you enjoyed it I strongly recommend trying her other novels as well. Grotesque was fantastic, though I really resent the editing the translation did to remove something that was probably a very effective thing in the novel. It staggers me that now, in 2015, people are able to remove sections of a work of literature because they don't like them, but still have the balls to release a version to get money. Fuck you people. But Kirino is great. emot-smile

I really liked Real World and was already considering reading my next book of hers in the original, this only seals it for me.
But speaking of taking liberties with translations, I'm reading Murakami's IQ84 in the original alongside the English translation and have noticed that the translator omits a very sentences here and there. It is not enough to change the tone or flow of the novels nor does it even pertain to any potentially sensitive material, instead of a deliberate butchery it feels more as if the translator missed a couple of lines out of lack of attention or because they were tired.
I wish I had kept a record of which bits of text did not make it into the translation, that way I could inform whoever it may concern and see if they could be re-introduced. I doubt anyone will notice unless they do as I did and contrast the translation with the original line by line.

wrote:

Stephen Hawking

I've had The Grand Design for ages now but never got around to reading it which is unforgivable.

Offline

 

#1535 | Back to Top06-11-2015 05:24:11 PM

Snow
Troublesome Insect
From: in the wolf
Registered: 09-30-2013
Posts: 642

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Giovanna wrote:

Grotesque was fantastic, though I really resent the editing the translation did to remove something that was probably a very effective thing in the novel. It staggers me that now, in 2015, people are able to remove sections of a work of literature because they don't like them, but still have the balls to release a version to get money.

I didn't want to ask before finishing the book lest I spoil something, but now I'm curious after reading it. What did they change? Everything I managed to find on the topic is quite vague about what exactly was edited out or changed.

Btw it was great! Thanks for the recommendation. The ending [was a bit of a bummer at first until I reminded myself not to take everything literally, and I'm presently amusing myself with various theories on what is what.
My take on it is that the prominent characters are just what the narrator says they are - parts of her, and it is arguable whether any of the events seen from their POV actually happened at all, or are just elaborate manifestations of her psyche. All the characters do exist in reality, but they are much different and might be only the base on which the narrator projects herself to compartmentalize and avoid facing reality. My theory is that she broke on the day her mother died, and while her central persona is seemingly unfazed by this, this deep feeling of abandonment and loneliness pervades the account of every other character, the trauma and sadness finding their way out of her system though elaborate illusion and self-deception. Her highschool experiences (as we learn from Mitsuru, quite different than what we heard) and her issues with womanhood are embodied in Yuriko and Kazue, with Yuriko as a bonus representation of her miserable family life and Kazue of her professional disappointment and poverty.
I'd say that Zhang and Yurio represent opposing desires in her. Yurio represents her all but extinguished desire for love, beauty, and life - something pure and innocent that she knows she'll never attain, just as Yurio will never be her son. Zhang, on the other hand, represents her desire for the void, for death and release - a monster without reserve to whom nothing is sacred, through whom she'll be able to cast aside all that binds her in her life. I'm unsure who the real Zhang is, but I think everything we hear from Kazue about him is based on the narrator's hope that such a man exists. She believes herself to be beyond saving and longs for such a person to put her out of her misery.
The arrival of Yurio gives a little hope of fixing this, but it ultimately fails. Her grandfather, possibly her only anchor to reality, dies, and the second break happens, the final one. Yurio's suggestion of going to the streets could be interpreted as the 'light side' of her finally giving up on her. The final lines of the novel have her as a streetwalker (or fantasizing of being one) on the lookout for Zhang. The man she's with is probably not him, the Zhang she thinks she needs never existed. But she's desperate to meet him. Death is now her only desire, and there's no hope left for her.
Depressing, but a logical conclusion to the novel.
]
I wish I made more sense, but it's late emot-frown

Offline

 

#1536 | Back to Top06-14-2015 05:43:02 AM

Atropos
Atropos Turretslayer
From: Hampden College
Registered: 10-22-2011
Posts: 906

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Currently reading The Abyss by Marguerite Yourcenar. Anyone have an opinion on this? It's got just about everything I like—historical setting, realistic occultism, and long theological discussions—so if that sounds like your cup of tea, be sure to check it out.

Offline

 

#1537 | Back to Top06-16-2015 09:18:16 AM

mistspinner
Ohtori Paramouri
Registered: 08-10-2013
Posts: 92

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Despite my asexuality and his marriage to Ayelet Waldman, I am fairly certain that if the opportunity arose, I would marry Michael Chabon. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and The Yiddish Policemen's Union were two of the best books I've read this year, and manage to be both delightfully fun and full of Heavy Things. Who knew I would be so heartbroken by gay, nerdy Jewish comic artists?

Offline

 

#1538 | Back to Top06-17-2015 09:33:17 PM

Nocturnalux
Qualified Duellist
From: Portugal
Registered: 09-10-2007
Posts: 741

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Atropos wrote:

Currently reading The Abyss by Marguerite Yourcenar. Anyone have an opinion on this? It's got just about everything I like—historical setting, realistic occultism, and long theological discussions—so if that sounds like your cup of tea, be sure to check it out.

I greatly enjoyed it. Had to check to see whether it was the same book as I read the Portuguese translation that keeps the title very close to the original (from L'Œuvre au noir to A Obra ao Negro). I too found the historical reconstruction to be extraordinary and the dedication put into the occult angle elevates the novel into a truly wonderful experience.

I'm presently reading Yourcenar's Memoirs of Hadrian and loving it just as much. It cannot help but remind me of I, Claudius in its confessional tone and subject matter but I prefer's Yourcenar's take. Her profound knowledge of classical themes really shines and she manages to convince the reader that these are indeed the reflections of the Emperor Hadrian.

Offline

 

#1539 | Back to Top06-18-2015 12:56:53 AM

Giovanna
Ends of the Forum
From: Edmonton, AB
Registered: 10-12-2006
Posts: 8754
Website

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Snow wrote:

What did they change? Everything I managed to find on the topic is quite vague about what exactly was edited out or changed.

All I could find about it was that there was an underage male prostitute in it that was entirely written out of the translation. Given the gritty nature of her style and the effect shock was meant to have, I definitely feel like they lost something important. Awesome insights by the way! It's been so long since I've read it, I'll have to give it another visit. emot-dance I was never entirely sure how literally I wanted to take some of it, but her other novel seemed fairly literal as well, like the circumstances were enough to do the high-minded stuff as it is. So I'm inclined to think she wasn't fantasizing in the end. But again, it's been a while...

Nocturnalux wrote:

I'm presently reading Yourcenar's Memoirs of Hadrian and loving it just as much. It cannot help but remind me of I, Claudius in its confessional tone and subject matter but I prefer's Yourcenar's take. Her profound knowledge of classical themes really shines and she manages to convince the reader that these are indeed the reflections of the Emperor Hadrian.

Oh oh this is right up my alley. I love ancient Rome and as much as I enjoyed I, Claudius, I have to admit when I tried the novel it was prohibitively dry a style of prose. I might look better on it now than I did back then, but I'm always in the market for Not Shitty historical fiction. Because man there's no shortage of the shitty kind.


Akio, you have nice turns of phrase, but your points aren't clear and you have no textual support. I can't give this a passing grade.
~ Professor Arisa Konno, Eng 1001 (Freshman Literature and Composition)

Online

 

#1540 | Back to Top06-18-2015 05:10:47 AM

Yams
Nest Boxer
From: Crystal Millenium
Registered: 02-13-2007
Posts: 969

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Reading Call of the Cthulu


http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i232/YamPuff/im%20holllowz_zpsx9ddh2gp.png~original

Offline

 

#1541 | Back to Top06-18-2015 11:43:21 AM

zeedikay
Sunlit Gardener (Prelude)
Registered: 02-22-2014
Posts: 171

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

I ended up listening to a bit of an audiobook version of Kurt Vonnegut's Welcome to the Monkey House a few days ago, and I can definitely see why he's considered one of the great American novelists of the 20th century. There's a sense that he gets the human mindset well, and even when he's not working with science fiction and other high concept works, he can take a plot and get as much as he can out of it.
Out of the odd 25 short stories collected in there, I only managed to catch about 4 of them, but they were enjoyable. I started off with Long Walk to Forever, which wasn't honestly my favorite, but had a general air of wistful melancholy that fit well. The Foster Portfolio on the other hand was amazing. On the surface it's a story about an investment consulter trying to manage one particular job, but it ends up being a really good character study. I honestly didn't know where it would go, and the ending, even if it might be a little obvious in hindsight, is just handled so well! Even if you just read one thing from this, I'd suggest this one.
Miss Temptation is good too, with more of a focus on gender politics and the mindset of the self-righteous. It defiantly feels like it was written in the late 50s, but it still feels relevant today and would be something I might recommend someone to check out if they wanted to look for something to think about.
On the other end of the spectrum is All the King's Men. It's still a pretty psychologically driven piece, this time dealing with war (especially the Cold War) and the disconnect with leaders and the people they govern and control. But it so reads like a pulp war story, with it's exaggerated gender and racial depictions. It's more of a thriller than the other stories I listened to, and it did do it's duty at that, actually making me anxious and engrossed with what the characters would do next. It saddles the line between patriotic war blockbuster and a psychological anti-war piece, but I still found it fascinating. I could easily see it adapted into a stage play or a retro-styled comic, with a few tweaks or not.
If I can find the audiobook again, or even get the actual book version, I'm sure I won't regret going through all of the stories. (I know Harrison Bergeron is one of the pieces on there, and I know I found that one interesting when I read it a few years back.) I know they're online, but having them in one place could be useful.

Offline

 

#1542 | Back to Top06-18-2015 12:44:25 PM

OnlyInThisLight
KING OF ALL DUCKS
Registered: 01-15-2008
Posts: 4411

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Reading The Goldfinch. Dead moms are always pretty.

Offline

 

#1543 | Back to Top06-18-2015 05:41:41 PM

gpink
Eternal Castellan
Registered: 11-21-2009
Posts: 266

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Just finished Chosen Soldier by Dick Couch.
Just started The Last Chapter The Facts about the last days of Grumman by Jake Bussolini.

Offline

 

#1544 | Back to Top06-21-2015 06:20:35 PM

Snow
Troublesome Insect
From: in the wolf
Registered: 09-30-2013
Posts: 642

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

The Gernsback Continuum. I'm starting to really like Gibson.

Offline

 

#1545 | Back to Top06-21-2015 06:40:50 PM

Decrescent Daytripper
Best Disney Princess
Registered: 04-09-2007
Posts: 2790

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

I'm rereading Spenser's The Faerie Queen with some hilariously outdated and condescending footnotes. I love how absolutely mad allegorical works could be back then, and how much appropriation was just a standard thing in English, so there are snatches from, echoes of other works regularly present. Just makes the whole thing feel like swimming in waves.

Snow wrote:

The Gernsback Continuum. I'm starting to really like Gibson.

The less I pay attention to that it's Gibson's work, the more I tend to like his work.

Though paying attention and playing Gibson-bingo can be fun, too.


My Brain is the Wakaba and Shiori Funtime Hour. With limited commercial interruption.

Offline

 

#1546 | Back to Top07-10-2015 01:53:03 PM

dlaire
A Whole Orange
From: Poland
Registered: 04-08-2007
Posts: 2322

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

I started to read The role of the reader by Umberto Eco. school-eng101
It's very interesting in spite of being filled with complicated language and terms I'm not very familiar with yet. emot-smile

Offline

 

#1547 | Back to Top07-15-2015 11:17:35 PM

satyreyes
no, definitely no cons
From: New Orleans, Louisiana
Registered: 10-16-2006
Posts: 10328
Website

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

In a different excellent thread, Gio called out Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale as one of the two books (along with The Little Prince) that she wished someone had made her read in high school.  I had never even heard of it; as far as I knew, it was one of the Canterbury Tales.  And that's how I read it, without knowing anything about it except that Gio liked it and thought it dealt with deep moral questions.  I'm glad I did.  I'm weirdly fascinated by dystopian fiction in general, both serious and unserious, but The Handmaid's Tale is exceptional, pulling off that feat of making you worry it could really happen.  Or that in some ways, in symbolic ways, that it describes what is already happening.  That's before we even get to the part where its dystopia is deeply tied up in gender, and manages to talk about gender realistically, frighteningly, and yet without demonizing or exonerating anyone.  It's a book about real people, not devils or saints; that's why it's believable.

Highly recommended. emot-smile

Offline

 

#1548 | Back to Top07-16-2015 01:20:29 AM

Giovanna
Ends of the Forum
From: Edmonton, AB
Registered: 10-12-2006
Posts: 8754
Website

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

emot-danceemot-danceemot-dance

I immediately interrupted Yasha's game to gush that you'd read it on such a recommendation. She's the one I have to thank for it, she'd been nagging me for years to read the book and once I did it was very clear why.

There ended up being a lot of things in the book that Yasha didn't actually understand, like that brown people are all named "Martha." This was such an explicit idea put so simply that I commented on the neatness of it, how in this one phrase it's made clear race relations has been distilled to an essence in this society. Yasha hadn't realized that, or why that specific name was such a good choice.

I found it fascinating as a dystopian USA because it's written by a Canadian, this outside glimpse seemed staggeringly obvious, not because she missed things, but because so many things are clearer from a few feet away. It really is a book about people, the humanity of the characters isn't placed on the back burner while the author maniacally flaunts their super scary amazing future ideas. That's all too common, and I don't necessarily hold it against authors when it happens. FFS, I read space opera. But when someone kicks the trend, it's something special. I was surprised you'd never heard of it, before I remembered I live in Canada, where people are dragged kicking and screaming through Canadian Lit and often don't shut up about it. emot-rolleyes

I recently read The Picture of Dorian Gray. I've avoided that entire era of writing like the plague since I was a child because I found it so horrifyingly dull, but this was not at all what I expected. It's an easy read, fun, and lets the story speak for itself instead of beating you senseless with the morals. In fact, it's hard to find the moral since the characters spend most of the novel being FABULOUS and BITCHY AS HELL. The conversations are pwn after pwn, to the point where they're unrealistic in how they depict people, but fun to read anyway because god damn what a catty bunch of clever fucks. I can't really say why, since they're not at all alike in personality, but for some reason, I kept thinking of Touga the entire novel.


Akio, you have nice turns of phrase, but your points aren't clear and you have no textual support. I can't give this a passing grade.
~ Professor Arisa Konno, Eng 1001 (Freshman Literature and Composition)

Online

 

#1549 | Back to Top07-16-2015 05:07:43 AM

Yams
Nest Boxer
From: Crystal Millenium
Registered: 02-13-2007
Posts: 969

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

Giovanna wrote:

I recently read The Picture of Dorian Gray. I've avoided that entire era of writing like the plague since I was a child because I found it so horrifyingly dull, but this was not at all what I expected. It's an easy read, fun, and lets the story speak for itself instead of beating you senseless with the morals. In fact, it's hard to find the moral since the characters spend most of the novel being FABULOUS and BITCHY AS HELL. The conversations are pwn after pwn, to the point where they're unrealistic in how they depict people, but fun to read anyway because god damn what a catty bunch of clever fucks. I can't really say why, since they're not at all alike in personality, but for some reason, I kept thinking of Touga the entire novel.

Well the thing is, it's Oscar Wilde so it pretty much can't have any morals or it goes against his own mantra that 'all art is quite useless'. I think that the idea of Dorian Grey has become so ingrained in the public consciousness as having these specific set of morals (like a Christmas Carol for example) when the truth is that point of the story is, as you say, catty people being clever fucks.


http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i232/YamPuff/im%20holllowz_zpsx9ddh2gp.png~original

Offline

 

#1550 | Back to Top07-16-2015 07:11:42 AM

Snow
Troublesome Insect
From: in the wolf
Registered: 09-30-2013
Posts: 642

Re: Favorite books/Books you are currently reading

YamPuff wrote:

Well the thing is, it's Oscar Wilde so it pretty much can't have any morals or it goes against his own mantra that 'all art is quite useless'. I think that the idea of Dorian Grey has become so ingrained in the public consciousness as having these specific set of morals (like a Christmas Carol for example) when the truth is that point of the story is, as you say, catty people being clever fucks.

So he was a 'art for its own sake' kinda guy, which would mean that you enjoying yourself while reading is pretty much all there is to it?
I didn't read much from Wilde, just his fairytales, which had classic fairy-tale morals. But then again, they were for kids. And the morals themselves, while admirable, were more hammered in than anything and your standard saccharine fare. What made the tales really enjoyable was the positively sensual storytelling style, and I believe that's a Wilde trademark more than anything else there.

It's always strange when big writers wrote for kids. You can't tell if it's their style in it's purest form or if they just give you the wrong idea entirely in there.

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB 1.2.23
© Copyright 2002–2008 PunBB
Forum styled and maintained by Giovanna and Yasha
Return to Empty Movement