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HOLY SHIT PEOPLE, IT'S NOT BAD ENOUGH WE'RE GETTING AN UTENA EXHIBITION RIGHT NOW

THEY. ARE. MAKING. A. NEW. MUSICAL. NEXT. YEAR. START LOSING YOUR SHIT RIGHT NOW

#1 | Back to Top07-17-2012 01:41:40 PM

Scoluron
Rose Bride
From: Portland, OR
Registered: 11-03-2009
Posts: 114

Makeup

What does makeup used in daily life mean for you?  Either wearing it, or seeing others wearing it?

The most common perception seems to be that wearing makeup is fun and helps cover up distasteful facial features that no one really wants to see, so gogo makeup.  Of course, not many men wear it, and there exists a certain double standard, but this particular double standard is generally considered a quirk of gender and not a problem.

For context: I have almost never worn makeup.  I find a tasteful dose of it attractive in feminine persons, but the majority of my relationship experience was with a person who adamantly refused to use it.  Only relatively recently did I truly understand how ubiquitous it is.  I'm trying to understand the thought processes that drive its prominence in American culture, especially in light of the related argument I hear for its use, that looking good => confidence (which more and more sounds like confidence = looking good).
[The Sailor Moon new series thread made me think of the fact that part of her transformation sequence in the original anime is the application of lipstick.  Which is sort of awesome, for a number of conflicting reasons.]

Edit: got rid of the bonus question, realized it strayed from the topic. emot-rolleyes

Last edited by Scoluron (07-17-2012 03:41:04 PM)


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#2 | Back to Top07-17-2012 02:23:25 PM

Varla
Touga Topper
From: Stirling, Scotland
Registered: 07-03-2011
Posts: 50
Website

Re: Makeup

It depends on why I'm wearing makeup that day, if I am. I don't associate it with gender.
Most of the time I look at it as an art form, and also a cultural aspect around the world. In highschool, I solely used it to cover facial 'flaws' at the time, especially since I had a woman cut my hair in my teens who would tell me crap like you have make it look like you don't have a mono-lid, Cover ALL your freckles, and the kicker tweeze your brows, don't trim them.

If I go to work I normally end up doing it because most places prefer women wear it. Which I loathe 85% of the time.  If I'm on a date, I'll probably try to look goddamn sexy. That said, I wear quite a lot if I'm out normally [eyeliner,mascara,foundation, concealer, powder, eyeshadow, lipstain,chapstick] . I used to swear I wouldn't wear any when I was younger, but as mentioned, I had my confidence broken quite a bit.

The double standard from makeup is the same with shaving, being overly thin or 'curvy', etc. To me it's society telling women that there is something wrong with them, and forcing some unattainable goal of perfection on them. There's always something that can be improved. Make up itself isn't oppressive to me, it's just when it's restricted to certain genders for certain reasons.

That's funny that you mentioned Sailor Moon, because I was talking with a friend the other day who wished that people got ready in transformation sequences. When I was younger I used to imagine the shower as a transformation scene.


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#3 | Back to Top07-17-2012 04:17:08 PM

Riri-kins
World's End
From: Cloud Nine
Registered: 09-22-2008
Posts: 2346

Re: Makeup

I enjoy wearing it and don't think it's about covering your flaws or ZOMG GIVING INTO MALE PRESSURE TO LOOK SEXY so much as it's about emphasizing your prettiest features.  Besides, it shows people you care about yourself. It's like brushing your teeth or washing your hair. That being said I confess I do see it as something feminine. Notice I didn't say weak. I said feminine.  Honestly, in my culture straight men just don't wear it. If a day comes when they do I'll be very surprised but will accept it.


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#4 | Back to Top07-17-2012 04:31:48 PM

Frau Eva
Voodoo Queen
Registered: 10-16-2006
Posts: 803

Re: Makeup

Riri-kins wrote:

I enjoy wearing it and don't think it's about covering your flaws or ZOMG GIVING INTO MALE PRESSURE TO LOOK SEXY so much as it's about emphasizing your prettiest features.  Besides, it shows people you care about yourself. It's like brushing your teeth or washing your hair. That being said I confess I do see it as something feminine. Notice I didn't say weak. I said feminine.  Honestly, in my culture straight men just don't wear it. If a day comes when they do I'll be very surprised but will accept it.

Showing people you care about yourself is especially important if you're fat. I'm fat, and one of the reasons I wear it everyday is to say, "See?! I still care about how I look! Please don't assume I'm a smelly troll that shoves anything within arms-reach into my mouth!" If I'm fat and I like to wear jeans and t-shirts, then I have to make a concession somewhere. And putting on make-up is not so bad to me--sort of like doing it. Besides, I have eyes that just really POP once you put on eyeshadow and liner. So it's the most worth it as far as comfort and effect. Not so much expense-wise though. emot-mad

When you're fat, you have to work harder just to be considered not a huge slob. Generally if you've got some overall great weight, hair, etc. genes, you can go out in sweats and no make-up all the time and no one cares. Also, I still have some acne I need to cover up now and then, even after the Accutane(it's better, but not totally gone). Especially right before that time of the month. Ya'll know what I'm talking about.


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#5 | Back to Top07-17-2012 05:16:29 PM

Lurv
Pained Growlithe
Registered: 05-25-2012
Posts: 520

Re: Makeup

I don't often wear makeup, but then I don't go out a lot either. I like to wear lipstick sometimes, though, but I figure it can look weird if I'm not at least wearing some mascara as well (I've given up on eyeliner).

Someone I know thinks lipstick looks "whorish" though. emot-rolleyes

It's like brushing your teeth or washing your hair.

Wearing makeup and washing is a little different. I think it's more like dying your hair (which can be fun).

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#6 | Back to Top07-17-2012 05:48:05 PM

OnlyInThisLight
KING OF ALL DUCKS
Registered: 01-15-2008
Posts: 4411

Re: Makeup

I couldn't give less of a shit what people think about my ability to care for myself based on my appearance.  If I wanna run around messy, I do.  I work and sometimes I am fucking tired.  There is no shame in that.  I take my pills and focus on my future -THAT is how I take care of myself.   I wear make-up because it's colorful and tiny and organized and fun.  The only time I wear make up because I HAVE (and if I didn't HAVE to, I would anyway because I like dressing up instead of putting on a Taco Bell uniform) is when I do research at Mental Health Court.  There, wearing suits, slacks, and well done make-up is unfortunately the unspoken way that you distinguish yourself from the offenders since you don't wear a uniform and in a crowded court room the Bailiff needs to be able to discern the student workers from the MHC offenders, some of whom are our age.

Make up itself is not oppressive, vain or gendered.  It's stuff you slap on your face to temporarily alter your appearance.  People ascribing status based on make-up and making judgements based on make-up, "That girl is wearing too much, she's dumb/a whore" or "That girl isn't wearing make-up, she must not care about herself/be poor/not be in a relationship/ lazy/ is ugly/ unwomanly" is what is problematic.

Last edited by OnlyInThisLight (07-17-2012 07:06:15 PM)

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#7 | Back to Top07-17-2012 06:33:33 PM

Honey Bear
Sunlit Gardener (Prelude)
From: England
Registered: 08-01-2011
Posts: 173
Website

Re: Makeup

Only ever worn it once or twice. Used to hate the stuff with a passion. Mainly because when I was a young'un and at school, I'd hear friends beating themselves up about how ugly they were without it. One mentioned how much she adored her boyfriend because he'd seen her without her makeup and still loved her. emot-confused

Since I've got older I've realised that not everyone feels that way and it really can just be for fun, but I still don't wear it myself. Maybe it's just because I'm not used to it but-- with foundation especially, but even just with lipstick-- I'm aware of it all the time. When I went to a photoshoot they used extra thick foundation, and it felt like I was wearing a mask or something. I was afraid to even touch my face! emot-tongue

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#8 | Back to Top07-17-2012 07:33:19 PM

Scoluron
Rose Bride
From: Portland, OR
Registered: 11-03-2009
Posts: 114

Re: Makeup

Sweet.  These are some really insightful responses, thanks! school-freud

How prohibitive is the cost?  I know it will vary wildly by usage rate, but I also don't know how expensive the stuff is.
In media I often see/hear people complaining that a very specific brand and color is discontinued, and they had to stock up on it or are s.o.l.  Why is this a problem?  Do people go to a sort of sample area where they figure out which combinations look best on them--or share among friends--and feel like they'll never find another equal brand/color for them?  Or do they just not want to have to keep trying new brands/colors out?  And if the latter...wouldn't finding new looks be part of the fun component of it all?


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#9 | Back to Top07-17-2012 08:08:08 PM

Aine Silveria
Pumpkin Bride
From: Allegan, MI
Registered: 11-03-2006
Posts: 2098

Re: Makeup

I kinda collect makeup but rarely use it. On a daily basis, the most I do is some sort of lip gloss. On dressy occasions, I'll do eyeshadow and lipstick. Eyeliner if I feel my delicate motor skills and symmetry skills are up to it. Rarely blush. I hate foundation. It either looks thick or does nothing. I wish I could keep polish from chipping so fast, because I'd wear it more.

You can find makeup costing anywhere from $5 to $50 (and up). It depends on whether you desire high-end brands like those Sephora sells, or if you're cool with drugstore brand makeup (which I usually find is quite fine. You'll hear the same from many beauty gurus on YT).

My male-bodied partner usually has nail polish on. He says it's for his job (he's a photo tech that does passport photos on a regular basis. It gives small children something to focus on when he takes the photo), but I know he wouldn't do it if he also didn't like it. He explains it once, and people usually leave him be about it.

Last edited by Aine Silveria (07-17-2012 08:13:47 PM)


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#10 | Back to Top07-17-2012 08:11:09 PM

gorgeousshutin
Bare Footman
Registered: 04-11-2012
Posts: 1312
Website

Re: Makeup

In Japan, it is common for trendy straight boys to wear eyeliner and such for the sake of looking attractive to women (since they found the bulky, hairy look to be ugly, and mostly prefer waif over beef); the male idols there, especially those from the elite Johnny Agency, all wear heavy makeup and have heavily styled hair.  This trend had since spread to Korea and China (which is now having a Peacock Male movement in its developing fashion industry)  in recent years.


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#11 | Back to Top07-17-2012 09:14:32 PM

OnlyInThisLight
KING OF ALL DUCKS
Registered: 01-15-2008
Posts: 4411

Re: Makeup

Aine, try Wet n Wild MegaLast nailpolish.  It's CRAZY cheap, around 99 cents a bottle, and anyone will tell you, nomatter if they perfer high-end or drugstore, it's some of the best stuff you can buy.  Applies smoothly and quickly, and with two coats to match bottle color and a top coat it's really chip resistant.  I wear it and it lasts me at least a week -and I work with gloves filled with an adhesive, so they are constantly being washed and exposed to the chemicals and powders inside the glove which deteriorate unpolished nails and of course at work I spend a few hours scrubbing dishes.  So it's pretty tough stuff.

I typically buy high-end myself, but that's because most of what I wear is foundation and a matte powder since work gets me all oily and both are products that I can purchase once and they last me near freaking forever, unlike mascaras and lip products that have shorter shelf lives and thus I buy from drugstores. 

Okay that and I put whiteliner on my waterline to trick people into thinking I'm awake.   FFFFFF.  Forever exhausted.   Actually, what I think I like about make-up is how tricky I feel.  Like, master of illusions or some crazyness.  Getting people I know to compliment my appearance while being unaware that I'm wearing make-up makes me feel like some sort of kick ass supervillian.  bwahahahahahaha

Last edited by OnlyInThisLight (07-19-2012 12:00:04 PM)

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#12 | Back to Top07-18-2012 10:29:45 PM

Brea_the_Brave
Saionji Slapper
From: Chicago, IL
Registered: 01-12-2012
Posts: 24

Re: Makeup

I wear a small amount of makeup every day. For my day to day activities I view make up as a waste of time and money but paradoxically I feel uneasy if I'm not wearing any. I hate being judged by my appearance; but the reality of the situation is almost everyone judges and is judged by everyone else.

I don't buy high end make up products unless it's in a special holiday pack, or other value set. In my personal experience, people have used my low end make up to discriminate against me. emot-rolleyes

Even though I have personal reservations about make up I do love it as a form of art. Some of the things that people are able to do with some eye make up and nail polish are simply breath-taking.

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#13 | Back to Top07-19-2012 12:05:57 PM

Riri-kins
World's End
From: Cloud Nine
Registered: 09-22-2008
Posts: 2346

Re: Makeup

Scoluron wrote:

In media I often see/hear people complaining that a very specific brand and color is discontinued, and they had to stock up on it or are s.o.l.  Why is this a problem?  Do people go to a sort of sample area where they figure out which combinations look best on them--or share among friends--and feel like they'll never find another equal brand/color for them?

Sort of. It's not just in the media.  Each woman has an individual look. For instance, I look best in peach or pink blush and hideous in orange. It would be nice if you could go to a sample area. I had to learn from my mother.

Believe it or not, I hated wearing it at first because it took so long and I looked like the popular girls who picked on me all the time. However, I soon realized that a person wasn't necessarily a bully just because she wore it. Now the only thing I dislike putting on is mascara because every freaking brand except Maybelline clumps.


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My Utena fanfiction: http://www.fanfiction.net/u/2000115/Riri-kins

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#14 | Back to Top07-19-2012 03:22:52 PM

OnlyInThisLight
KING OF ALL DUCKS
Registered: 01-15-2008
Posts: 4411

Re: Makeup

Mocha gave me sage advice on setting the mascara tube under running hot water while you put on the rest of your make-up.  That and making sure if you have thin lashes you are using a thicker, dry formula that will hold them up and if you have thick lashes to use a wet formula to coat them.  A wet formula on thin lashes just weighs them down and dry formula on thick lashes clumps.

Not that tubes SAY wet/dry formula, you just kinda have to test. 

Also the brush makes a difference.  Brushes with wide gaps between the bristles (and typically shorter bristles) are for volume -the lashes fall into the grooves and wick up the mascara better and the short bristles allow you to place the brush closer to the base of the lashes, creating volume.  Brushes with long, more closely packed bristles are for length -the dense bristles weave between and separate lashes better so that it's easier for mascara to cover them all the way to to the tip, which creates length.

Just remember that and to never rely on a mascara, nomatter what is advertised, to curl your lashes, at the end of the day you have to do that yourself.  :/ 

And having a color you love discontinued does suck.  Even people who like to explore many different looks and styles still usually have their daily routine.  Finding an eyeshadow shade that works well for casual and formal occasions, is neutral enough to compliment most outfits/make-up while still making you, in particular, look awesome is what's considered a Holy Grail product (even more so if a little lasts you forever and it doesn't cake, crease or have bad fallout).  Mine is Clinique's eyeshadow in Desert Sun.  I put that shit on everything.

Oh fuck I really like make-up NO ONE TELL MY TEN YEAR OLD SELF.

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#15 | Back to Top07-19-2012 04:17:10 PM

Katzenklavier
Wondrous Sexual Eggplant.
From: Back of your thoughts.
Registered: 09-13-2008
Posts: 1120

Re: Makeup

OiTL wrote:

Mine is Clinique's eyeshadow in Desert Sun.  I put that shit on everything.

Sounds delicious.

But I think you hit it right on the mark that versatility is key to the right make-up. Color stories are unique to each individual. There are prime, secondary, and tertiary skintones to consider. Add that to hair and eyes and allergies and the occasional dissociative connotations inherent in the process - make-up becomes quite the daunting clusterfuck. You have a much better grasp of the science than I, but here are my tidbits of advice anyway.

Probably the most useful process for me personally has been using the seasonal system. It's a relic of the 80s, but extremely offers extremely good advice for considering tonality. Make-up, in all of its culturally enforced artificiality, really is an art. Putting it on is a similar function to painting. Tools, colors, and the interplay of such elements all make a difference.

I hate to pimp out really really expensive products, but the sensitivity of my skin necessitates drastic measures. I use the Too-Faced Naked Eye Palette which is PHENOMENAL. The packaging comes with truly helpful instructions and shades that are easy to blend (which is half the fun). It is pricey, but it's lasted me a couple years. Like the jeans that are expensive when you get them, but are so durable they save you lots of costly trips to Wal-Mart.

And what does make-up mean to me? The ultimate suit of armor.


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#16 | Back to Top07-19-2012 04:55:39 PM

Scoluron
Rose Bride
From: Portland, OR
Registered: 11-03-2009
Posts: 114

Re: Makeup

Katzenklavier wrote:

And what does make-up mean to me? The ultimate suit of armor.

Eh?  Could you expand on that?
I grew up with frugal parents making me wear hand-me-downs, so I know what it's like to put on well-fitting and newish clothing and feel like there's something in the world that I don't have to worry about that I usually would.  But I sense that your feeling is stronger and possibly different?


"Himemiya! I've misjudged you!" "My image of you is ruined."

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#17 | Back to Top07-19-2012 05:24:13 PM

Katzenklavier
Wondrous Sexual Eggplant.
From: Back of your thoughts.
Registered: 09-13-2008
Posts: 1120

Re: Makeup

Scoluron wrote:

But I sense that your feeling is stronger and possibly different?

Why is make-up a multibillion dollar industry? It thrives on competition and insecurities. I grew up in a family where success and appearance are crucial to receiving attention. People tell me that's shallow and disgusting. But then I see a culture that fetishizes individuality, and that we are too lost in ourselves to be anything but superficial. Cross-cultural research indicates that Westerners are more likely to commit the fundamental attribution error, more likely to perceive the physical and personality traits of others as static, and thus mentally conditioned to see beauty as inherent. Thus, in a culture where innateness is prized over effort, looks are too often perceived as indicative of worth. I don't agree with it. But it's not a question of morals, it just is.

When I do put make-up on, it's often self-expression, but I also feel as if I'm saving my true face for myself. The rest of the world can see the currency.


We must go forward, not backward. Upward, not forward. And always twirling, twirling, twirling towards freedom.

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#18 | Back to Top07-19-2012 07:55:16 PM

Scoluron
Rose Bride
From: Portland, OR
Registered: 11-03-2009
Posts: 114

Re: Makeup

Katzenklavier wrote:

I don't agree with it. But it's not a question of morals, it just is.

My own tendency would be to rebel.  If I was a woman (and thus makeup was expected), anyone who cared about whether or not I wore makeup would fail a sort of automatic test and lose my respect.
Of course, not the best way to network or relate to the majority of people. emot-frown


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#19 | Back to Top07-19-2012 09:13:12 PM

Frau Eva
Voodoo Queen
Registered: 10-16-2006
Posts: 803

Re: Makeup

Well, people won't SAY that they think you should wear makeup. It's seen as pretty optional if you have good skin genes. But if you don't and you are prone to being greasy or have uneven skintone or acne, then people will act like you should fix that. But they won't say you should wear makeup, they'll say you just need to wash your face or stop eating chocolate AS IF THAT'S WHAT CAUSES THAT. emot-mad So if you were a woman, I doubt people would really give you crap about not wearing makeup unless you were with some unusually catty people. This does not apply to middle school, where everyone is catty about everyone all the time. I remember feeling inadequate because I wasn't shaving my legs in the FOURTH GRADE like all the other girls. Now that I'm an adult, I see why my Mom was like, "WTF?" If you were a woman though, you would get ENDLESS shit if you didn't shave. Not even if you only have the smallest of noticeable peachfuzz on your upper lip.

Maria Bamford has a great joke about the time her Mom told her, "Honey, when you don't wear makeup, you look mentally ill." So she put on bright green eyeshadow and red lipstick AROUND her lips and screamed, "BABY LOOK PRETTY NOW, MOMMY?!"


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#20 | Back to Top07-19-2012 10:38:44 PM

gorgeousshutin
Bare Footman
Registered: 04-11-2012
Posts: 1312
Website

Re: Makeup

Hi Frau Eva:

I can't help but notice your postings about acne.  As a male who had suffered for years under serious, scarring acne, but has now gotten rid of them and stayed (mostly) clear-skinned for years, please allow me to give a little advice on this topic.

Different people have different skin types, and from what you said yours seems to be a mixed skin-type rather like mine - prone to sweat-grease, but will feel drawn tight after washing with face wash; when applying moisturing cream to stop the post wash tightness/skin flaking, will again feel greasy.

The problem is not that you don't wash your face, but rather, you might not be giving your skin-type the right kind of washing and moisturizing.

Being that you are female and wears foundation-type makeup regularly, you might want to consider using exfoliating face wash at least three times per week - of the non-microbead, meltable sodium-based variety so you don't have to worry about it getting into your eye; that way, you can keep your pore unclogged and your face can breath easy. Plus, acne scarring will fade somewhat, if not disappear completely, after prolonged, regular using of exfoliating face wash.  Exfoliating is expecially important for mixed skin-type after applying sun block to the face - even those of the touch dry variety.  Use moderate lukewarm water for washing.

Now, on closing up the opened pores post washing with cold fluids.

For me, I'm Asian and I eat rice regularly.  I wash my rice with water twice prior to cooking it: once to get rid of what dirt could be there, the other time solely for generating a milky solution that is the rice water - rich in skin nourishing nutrients and can break down face old and lighten skin tone.  Every time after washing and exfoliating my face, I apply fridge frozen ice cold rice water to my face - to close up the post wash opened pores and firm up my skin again.  Take care not to get it in the eye (keep them closed) for fear of irritation, splash regular cold water to wash it off face afterwards since some people claim leaving it on the skin without washing it off irritates it (though I myself never had this problem).   

Then, on moisturizing, which is a MUST for any skin type.  Non-moisturized skin, drawn tight, will secrete face oil and make the face all oily again even after you just finished washing it.   The trick is to apply the right kind/amount of moisturizer on the post wash, post cold fluid splashed face.

Being that you claim to have greasy skin, face moisturizer for men - usually designed for oilier skin - might work better for you than those marketed to women.  For me, I make sure my face is wet as I apply little amounts of moisturizer on my skin, so it'd get diluted by water and be just the right amount I need.

Lastly, diet.  My dermatologist told me flat out that we are what we eat: that chocolates, red meat and fried foods (including sweet stuff like donuts) are big no-nos to acne prone people; having minimized my intake of all three - while washing my face right, while eating more grapefruits, apples, and fresh green peppers - the ache did die down within three months (that and I lost like three inches to my waist), and had never recurred for like the past five years.   

The above is what worked for me.  Hope this can at least give you some food for thought as you explore your options in attaining healthier skin, Frau Eva.


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#21 | Back to Top07-20-2012 12:00:40 AM

Katzenklavier
Wondrous Sexual Eggplant.
From: Back of your thoughts.
Registered: 09-13-2008
Posts: 1120

Re: Makeup

Scoluron wrote:

My own tendency would be to rebel.  If I was a woman (and thus makeup was expected), anyone who cared about whether or not I wore makeup would fail a sort of automatic test and lose my respect.

Although since our media and social context often promote rebellion of the hero against collectivist rape, perhaps my wearing make-up for the benefit of others is its own form of defiance.


We must go forward, not backward. Upward, not forward. And always twirling, twirling, twirling towards freedom.

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#22 | Back to Top07-20-2012 12:31:12 AM

Scoluron
Rose Bride
From: Portland, OR
Registered: 11-03-2009
Posts: 114

Re: Makeup

Katzenklavier wrote:

Although since our media and social context often promote rebellion of the hero against collectivist rape, perhaps my wearing make-up for the benefit of others is its own form of defiance.

That doesn't seem likely. emot-confused
Mostly because even if society promotes rebellion, on average people still don't.


"Himemiya! I've misjudged you!" "My image of you is ruined."

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#23 | Back to Top07-20-2012 01:00:07 AM

Katzenklavier
Wondrous Sexual Eggplant.
From: Back of your thoughts.
Registered: 09-13-2008
Posts: 1120

Re: Makeup

Against what?

Be yourself. Think for yourself. Stand up for what you believe in. These are the mantras that are the lifeblood of American society. We are conditioned from an early age to believe in Horatio Alger, disbelieve the power of circumstance, and that an expression of individuality manifests in rebellion against institutions. But, as you noted, that doesn't always translate to reality. Our mutualistic natures belie such ideals. And even if we try to define ourselves outside of the "norm", it is our perception thereof that frames such an uprising. So defiance of make-up based on individual decision, I argue, is actually a very strong example of our cultural lens.

I don't mean to insult your belief, which I think is very valid. It's just an interesting topic.

EDIT: Although a bit of a tangent. If you want to continue this discussion, maybe we should move here. emot-keke

Last edited by Katzenklavier (07-20-2012 01:30:51 AM)


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#24 | Back to Top07-21-2012 07:23:35 AM

Frau Eva
Voodoo Queen
Registered: 10-16-2006
Posts: 803

Re: Makeup

Was suddenly reminded of this today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OYpwAtnywTk


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#25 | Back to Top08-09-2012 03:30:21 PM

lex
Master Dominus of SRS BZN
From: in absolute splendor
Registered: 11-27-2007
Posts: 1784

Re: Makeup

Thread Necro'd!

(Always wanted to type that and now I have muhahahahahaha...ha.)

What does makeup mean for me?

I wear quite a bit of makeup actually. I don't do a "natural face" either because I have my own personal reservations against it, like if I'm going to do "natural" for me, I feel like not wearing makeup. To me, my makeup is completely artificial, sometimes it brings out my better qualities and downplays the ones I'm not too keen on but makeup is artifice and it's artifice that I can control. I read in the thread someone saying it's like armor and I agree with that statement. It's a definite confidence boost and it gives this feeling of being prepared.  I collect make up as well. I own an entire tupperware box (not a small one either) of just false eyelashes that I had to take a break from wearing because they were damaging my natural eyelashes. I wear two different brands of mascara at once and at least 6 coats of mascara. Perhaps I'm addicted to it...ehh.

I try to take good care of my skin as well because of how much makeup I do wear, when I'm not wearing makeup, I just go bare faced. Sometimes going bare faced makes me feel very self-conscious because I don't have piles of eyeshadow, eyeliner, foundation and the such to hide behind.

Stormy is in awe of makeup I think, he likens it to a science of some sort and I can see that comparison. Wearing make up is not that simple, I mean it can be simple but sometimes it's a process with mixing and steps and the tools that you need.


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